Page 6 - Large Print Books July-September 2017
P. 6

Charnwood
August
Susanna Beard
Dare To Remember
Reeling from a brutal attack that
leaves her best friend dead and her
badly injured, Lisa Fulbrook flees to
the countryside to recuperate. With
only vague memories of the event,
she isolates herself from her friends
and family, content to spend her
days wandering the hills with her
neighbour's dog, Riley. However,
Lisa is soon plagued, not only by
vivid flashbacks, but questions, too:
How did their assailant know them?
Why were they attacked? And what
really happened that night? As she
desperately tries to piece together
the memories, Lisa realises that
there's another truth still hidden to
her, a truth she can't escape from. A
truth that may have been right in front of her all along...
“Intriguing and gripping.” RACHEL ABBOTT
“This is a great exploration into the psychological impact of a traumatic event. It kept me reading into the night as I raced to find out how this twisty, shocking story would end.” SAM CARRINGTON
Thriller 328pp
Patrick Deeley
The Hurley Maker's Son
Patrick Deeley's train journey home
to rural East Galway in autumn
1978 was a pilgrimage of grief:
his giant of a father had been
felled, the hurley-making workshop
silenced. From this day, Patrick
unfolds his childhood as a series
of evocative moments, from the
intricate workings of the timber
workshop run by his father, to the
slow taking apart of an old tractor
and the physical burial of a steam
engine; from his mother's steady
work on an old Singer sewing
machine, to his father's vertiginous
quickstep on the roof of their house.
With his descriptions of the natural
world and delightful cameos of
characters and incidents from a not-so-long-ago country childhood, Patrick pays homage to the fields and townlands of his youth.
“Beautifully written.” MICHAEL HARDING
“A glorious book, a perfect elegy, a gorgeous tumble of memories of life, death, love and, above all, family. The Hurley Maker's Son is suffused with warmth and joy and an ineffable sadness. The closing passages, like many in this book, are exquisite and almost unbearable.” DONAL RYAN
Nick Coleman
Pillow Man
William has a good, steady job in
retail. He works in the bedlinen
department of an Oxford Street
store. He knows everything there is
to know about comfy. Lucy has a
portfolio career which, in her view,
is no kind of career at all. Her life
is in a mess; her love life even
more unsatisfactory than that. She
wouldn't be comfortable if she sat
on a sofa in Heal's. Unable to sleep,
she thinks a new pillow might be
the answer. William and Lucy are not
connected. Yet the pair of them share
a terrible memory from the past –
the sort of joint recollection that
changes with the light, depending
on who you were and where you
were standing at the time. The question is: what to do with it?
“Full of melancholy wit...” MAIL ON SUNDAY
“Coleman imbues his writing with a dry wit that enlivens the everyday, and with pithy character descriptions.”
General Fiction 320pp
Maeve Haran
The Way We Were
THE INDEPENDENT ON SUNDAY
N/F
5
N/F:Memoir 280pp
General Fiction 408pp LARGE PRINT BOOKS
Rachel is a promising A-level
student – until she falls for sexy,
dangerous Marko (Heathcliff with a
nose stud). Her mother, Catherine,
is trying to be a good parent and
work colleague – but wishes the
attentions of her attractive boss
didn't suddenly seem so alluring.
Grandmother Lavinia is certain of
her values, protecting the country
village she loves from change –
until the return of a long-lost love
reminds her that life moves on,
for people as well as places. Is it
too late for her to embrace change
and find happiness? After all these
years – and a lifetime divided by
convention – could they really
throw other people's expectations to the wind and be the way they were?


































































































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